September 2016

A useful feature native feature of Chrome is its ‘Task Manager’, which allows one to monitor all Chrome processes and their resource consumption:
Google Chrome Task Manager

Firefox has been slow to adopt parallel functionality, though this is mostly that multi-process mode in Firefox hadn’t become available until recently (at least in non-Nightly releases). One still needs to install this Task Manager Firefox add-on — though I would not be surprised to see if this became built-in to Firefox sometime in the near future.

Firefox Task Manager

  1. Enroll in Apple’s Beta Software Program.
  2. Download a fresh copy of VMware Workstation Player for Windows or Linux from the official VMware site. The free trial of this product has no expiration if used for non-commercial purposes.
  3. You’ll need to unlock your installation of VMware to use Mac operating system as a guest following these instructions (external link).
  4. On a computer running an official/genuine instance of OS X, download macOS Sierra from the App Store:
    App Store - macOS Sierra
  5. Once the download completes, open the Terminal application, and either save a new file with the following contents,
     #!/bin/bash
    # Mount the installer image
    hdiutil attach /Applications/Install\ macOS\ Sierra.app/Contents/SharedSupport/InstallESD.dmg -noverify -nobrowse -mountpoint /Volumes/install_app
    
    # Create the macOS-Sierra Blank ISO Image of 7316mb with a Single Partition - Apple Partition Map
    hdiutil create -o /tmp/macOS-Sierra.cdr -size 7316m -layout SPUD -fs HFS+J
    
    # Mount the macOS-Sierra Blank ISO Image
    hdiutil attach /tmp/macOS-Sierra.cdr.dmg -noverify -nobrowse -mountpoint /Volumes/install_build
    
    # Restore the Base System into the macOS-Sierra Blank ISO Image
    asr restore -source /Volumes/install_app/BaseSystem.dmg -target /Volumes/install_build -noprompt -noverify -erase
    
    # Remove Package link and replace with actual files
    rm /Volumes/OS\ X\ Base\ System/System/Installation/Packages
    cp -rp /Volumes/install_app/Packages /Volumes/OS\ X\ Base\ System/System/Installation/
    
    # Copy macOS Sierra installer dependencies
    cp -rp /Volumes/install_app/BaseSystem.chunklist /Volumes/OS\ X\ Base\ System/BaseSystem.chunklist
    cp -rp /Volumes/install_app/BaseSystem.dmg /Volumes/OS\ X\ Base\ System/BaseSystem.dmg
    
    # Unmount the installer image
    hdiutil detach /Volumes/install_app
    
    # Unmount the macOS-Sierra ISO Image
    hdiutil detach /Volumes/OS\ X\ Base\ System/
    
    # Convert the macOS-Sierra ISO Image to ISO/CD master (Optional)
    hdiutil convert /tmp/macOS-Sierra.cdr.dmg -format UDTO -o /tmp/macOS-Sierra.iso
    
    # Rename the macOS-Sierra ISO Image and move it to the desktop
    mv /tmp/macOS-Sierra.iso.cdr ~/Desktop/macOS-Sierra.iso

    or run

    curl https://www.nickmcummins.com/make-macos-sierra-iso.sh > /tmp/make-macos-sierra-iso.sh

    and then execute it by running sudo chmod +x /tmp/make-macos-sierra-iso.sh && /tmp/make-make-macos-sierra-iso.sh. Once completed, you should see a file named macOS-Sierra.iso on your desktop.

  6. Now boot up VMware Player and create a new virtual machine using the File dialog. Using the iso disk image we just created, and with macOS 10.12 selected as the guest os, finish the setup for your new image.
    Guest Operating System - Select macOS 10 12
  7. You’ll need to erase the virtual hard disk medium as seen in the following screenshots. DiskUtility - VMware Virtual STA hHard Drive
    DiskUtility - Erase Hard Drive confirmation
  8. Now you will be able to proceed with the installation. Once completed, you should be all ready to enjoy your new macOS Sierra vm!
    Installation macOS Sierra
    macOS Sierra Screenshot

This basically involves two steps:

  1. Client-side support, aka adding the required decoding libraries on the local computer. See official documentation: Enabling the H.264 codec on the NoMachine client host. Here is an example of following the steps on my Macbook Air:
    
    brew update
    brew install ffmpeg && brew upgrade ffmpeg
    cd /usr/local/Cellar/ffmpeg/3.0.2/lib
    sudo cp libavcodec.dylib /Applications/NoMachine/Contents/Frameworks/lib
    sudo cp libavutil.dylib /Applications/NoMachine/Contents/Frameworks/lib
    

Setting a custom resolution to that of the guest monitor

Say you have two monitors physically connected to the server, supporting by default maximum resolutions of 1440x900 and 1600x900. If you are logging in to the remote server from a machine that has a larger display, it may be difficult to add the new resolution. I have attempted to follow dozens of similar instructions I found online, with little luck. The only thing that worked for me seems like a hack, but it works.

➜  xrandr  | grep -i primary 
DVI-D-0 connected primary 1440x900+0+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 410mm x 257mm

We’ll be using the scale option of randr to change our resolution in this case, i.e. (x resolution)(x scale factor) = (desired x resolution); (y resolution)(y scale factor) = (desired y resolution). You’ll want to use at least a few decimal places for non-truncating decimal numbers unless your scaling factor is a rational number:

xrandr --output DVI-D-0 --scale 1.3333333x1.33333333

Afterwards, you should see this represented if you run the initial xrandr command above.

➜ xrandr  | grep -i primary 
DVI-D-0 connected primary 1920x1200+0+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 410mm x 257mm